More Covid Marketing

It took all weekend, but I managed to make a Twitter post on Canva! Then I uploaded it to Twitter via Canva’s direct “post to Twitter now.” That was a mistake as I could not add my buy link to my tweet post. A problem with Canva is you can’t put the buy link into a Canva design. Just pop it beneath the tweet. Or use the Word Press link or caption option if you’re blogging.

I hope you can see that I am not very far at all in my quest to master Canva. I would take a class if I could find one. I already looked for Canva for Dummies but there is no such book. I was only able to make the above tweet because I used a stock template and changed the words in the text boxes. So, really, I’m not Canva ready. I’m just bungling along.

Also, all last week, when my book released, guess what everyone was tweeting about? The election. Which, okay, that was way more important than my new book release. So I decided to use the time to learn Canva. It is clear I need more time. Much more time. Or a class. Probably both.

One tip I do have is to talk to your writer friends now, especially those with book releases about the same time as yours. What are they doing? My writing friend Linda told me to use Canva for tweets and Facebook. She also said we should do an online “two writers talking about writing” thing. I liked that idea, but I told her I know nothing about Zoom except how to click on the link the leader sends.

But darn if she didn’t only find out how to do it, she found a writer who wanted to host us on her online program: Pink Panther Presents Author Talk. Our talk will be streamed live November 20 at 4 pm and anybody can watch it for free. So, we are still dealing with Covid, but there are ways to market your new release even if you are a tech disaster like me.

I must mention that I have had a website and a blog since 2002 and I use them as my platform base. My son suggested I start a blog way back and he taught me everything I know about having an online presence. If you don’t have a good website (I like Word Press and I pay $100 a year so there are no ads.) that’s my #1 tip. Get a website and start blogging! When I need help with technical aspects of my site, I use Bakerview Consulting; they are wonderful and also Word Press experts.

Another writing friend, Barb, has a book coming out December 9 and we share the same publisher, the lovely Wild Rose Press, who tweeted out my new release last week. Barb offered to interview me on her blog and I said wouldn’t it be fun to switch blogs for a day? I’d write a blog for her site and she’d write one for mine. About our new releases, of course. So really the basics of marketing online are having a platform like a website, use it to blog, then link posts on social media. Also, you gotta have writer friends. Those are my top two suggestions.

Suggestion three is for people who are good at online design. Make all those great Twitter and Facebook posts and pin them. Just don’t overdo promotion on Twitter and Facebook. Pinning a marketing post is fine, but scheduling your lovely designed posts to pop up every hour is not cool. Social sites require social engagement in a meaningful way. That means don’t just tweet fancy ways to say buy my book. But, hey, if you want to, here’s my link: https://amzn.to/34MK3FY.

15 Years

15 years ago this month I started this blog. Back then, I called it “A Writer’s Diary” as a  homage to the Virginia Woolf book of the same name, the one with all the writing related entries from her journals assembled by her husband after her death. I read Woolf and other writers’ biographies, memoirs, and even their collected letters. I read May Sarton’s “Journal of a Solitude” and Hemingway’s “A Movable Feast.” Pretty much anything writers had to say on their craft, I read.

The internet was pretty new then, or it was to me. I did belong to one fan group though, on Yahoo. Are there still fan groups? I don’t even know. Anyway, a fan started a group to talk about one of my favorite contemporary writers so I joined. I got really into it. Maybe a bit too much. I posted lots of writerly type comments, asking the other fan/writers questions or just getting something writing related off my chest. It was fun and a highlight of my day. Then it wasn’t anymore.

I know this about myself: sometimes I am too enthusiastic and I can get ahead of things. Always with good intentions, but some people don’t like it and if I try to leap over them, I stumble. This happened then and I left the group. I was telling my son about it while he was hooking up my new computer. Telling the story, I started to cry a little bit, which was embarrassing because I always try to be strong for my kids. I told him how stupid I felt about tears. It was a dumb fan group and the mean girls made me look bad in front of the famous author. Big deal.

My son was so sweet and sympathetic. He said “You should start a blog.” This was 2002. I said “Aren’t blogs over?” He laughed and said “No, they’re going to get a lot bigger.” And he set me up. He registered cynthiaharrison.com, found me a host, designed my first page and managed my blog for ten years. Eventually it grew into a website highlighting my blog posts.

I uploaded an entry every day of those ten years, usually about whatever novel I was working on, what was going good and what my problems were with the days’ pages, which editor from what publishing house was interested in a query. Who had rejected the current manuscript. It was raw data. I never edited those posts. Really, when I started blogging, nobody edited their posts and they weren’t meant to be polished pieces.

My first novel came out around that ten year mark and I realized my son had been exactly right. Tons of people were blogging about writing, some of them authors using their  websites as platforms for their work. The official word from marketing departments  was that writers should blog to keep their websites “live” and attract readers. Not every writer has a website, and not every writer with a website has a blog. But lots do.

After 2,519 blog entries, and ten published books, my blog is now occasional and only one part of the ever-expanding website. Barb of Bakerview Consulting (I found her five years ago on Twitter!) designed a site I love that reflects my pride in having become a published author as well as my new laid back approach to blogging.

Today I was having coffee with a friend who suggested I take a look at my blog posts. She believes there’s a book in here somewhere. I just sent my current manuscript off to my editor, and I don’t have a good idea for new novel yet. Maybe, like my son’s suggestion 15 years ago, this is something I can do.